Tag Archives: bat control

Rabid Bats In Illinois

rabid bats

According to the Chicago Tribune, the amount of bats that have tested positive for rabies in Illinois is doubled comparatively to last year. Last year at this point, there were eight positive rabies tests. Currently there are 16. Though these numbers are small and it is early in the season, it could be indicative of a trend this year.

Bats are found everywhere in the state, including the Chicagoland area. Rabid bats have been found in homes in Arlington Heights, Aurora, LaGrange, and Chicago’s south side. The family from Arlington Heights is pursuing rabies vaccinations. Most rabid bats found last year were in Cook and Will counties. Will county had a record setting 20 cases of bat rabies.

Several species of bat are found in Illinois. Big brown bats and small brown bats are quite common, even in urban areas. Officials say that bats are common transmitters of rabies because they are often in contact with humans. Bats can also transmit rabies to other mammals like dogs, foxes, skunks, and raccoons.

To avoid catching rabies, it’s advised to avoid contact with wild animals including stray cats and dogs. Especially avoid animals that are typically nocturnal but may be acting strangely during daylight hours. Do not leave food outside that may attract wild animals. Seal off any entry points to your home, or other buildings like sheds and garages, that wild animals may enter. Bats can enter through small entry pints near windows, attics, soffits, and spaces in your home’s siding. Keep your family pets’ vaccines up to date and do not let them roam without supervision.

If you believe a rabid animal has bitten you, seek medical attention immediately. If there are animal pests on your property or in your home, call pest control to have them safely removed.

Attic Solutions Alert: Rabid Bats in Chicago Area

Bat, rabies, rabid batsAccording to a recent news report on ABC 7 Chicago, a local Naperville, Illinois family required rabies treatment after finding a rabid bat in their home. The family called Animal Control upon discovering the bat, which tested positive for rabies. Animal Control advised the entire family be inoculated against the disease since bats have such tiny teeth and could penetrate without leaving a mark.

Dr. Leroy Schild of Will County Animal Control advised that there were 13 cases of rabid bats in 2014 and 11 cases already this year. “This year is particularly bad because of the wet spring-… A lot of moisture, a lot of insects [sic] big food source for ’em,” he said.

Another family in Homer Glen found six rabid bats living in their garage and were also treated for rabies as a precaution. Animal Control authorities passed out flyers to neighbors in the area so they were aware of the situation.

It may seem unlikely that bats could get in your home, but you would be surprised how easy it is. Because bats are so small, it is not difficult for them to sneak in through a crevice, window, or chimney and move into your attic or basement.

As soon as you suspect you may have a bat infestation, call Attic Solutions immediately at 847-464-1861 for removal. We are trained professionals and equipped to deal with bat exclusion and removal. We will remove the bats and fix any property damage they may have caused.

White Nose Syndrome Cure For Bats?

white nose syndromeOver the last decade, white-nose syndrome has killed more than 5.7 million bats across the United States and Canada. The disease was originally discovered in New York in 2006 and has spread at a rapid pace across the country since then. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources recently issued a statement cautioning Illinois residents that entire bat populations were dying throughout the Eastern United States while they hibernated in their caves and mines.

White-nose syndrome is named for a white fungus or mold (Pseudogymnoascus destructans [SU-doh-JIM-no-ASK-us DIH-STRUK-tans], also known as Pd) that grows on the nose and wings of infected bats. The fungus eats holes in the wings of bats, which causes them to become too weak to hunt. The bats eventually lose their fat reserves, which they need to survive during the winter and then starve to death. Interestingly, this same fungus does not kill bats in Europe because it seems to have evolved.

So far, while researchers and scientists have explored many white-noise treatments, none of the tested bats have been returned to the wild. That is, until May 19, 2015. On that night, a group of scientists released 150 bats that had been treated for white-nose syndrome back into the wild near Hannibal, Missouri. As recently as last fall, those same bats were suffering from the fungus. While the results are encouraging, since this was the first group of bats returned to the wild after being treated for white-nose syndrome  we still have yet to see what happens. Craig Willis, a biologist at the University of Winnipeg in Canada who studies bats, but was not involved in this project says “there’s still a lot we need to know [about bats and the treatment] before we can get close to calling this or anything else a ‘cure.’”

Bat Species in Illinois

Bat Species in Illinois - Small Brown Bat

In this post, we review the most common species of bats found in Illinois.

If you need bat removal services from your Chicagoland home, please call us at (847) 464-1861

Bats are found throughout the United States and all of North America. They are actually the second largest order of mammals and comprise about 20% of all mammal species in the world. There are over 1,200 species of bats worldwide.

The most bat-heavy area of the state is in the southern area of Illinois, near the Mississippi and Illinois rivers.

Some bats hibernate in Illinois, while others migrate to warmer states.

 

How many types of bats are found in Illinois?

There are 12 different species of bats that are commonly found in Illinois.

Don’t be alarmed; all of the bats who call Illinois home are insectivorous, which means they only hunt insects.

The bat species that are most commonly found nesting in homes, attics and structures are the Little Brown Bat ( Myotis Lucifugus ) and Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus Fuscus ).

Related: How to Get Bats Out of the House

 

Types of Illinois Bats

  • Little Brown Bat
  • Big Brown Bat
  • Southeastern Bat
  • Indiana Bat
  • Eastern Pipistrelle
  • Northern Long-Eared Myotis
  • Gray Bat
  • Silver-Haired Bat
  • Eastern Red Bat
  • Hoary Bat
  • Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat
  • Evening Bat

 

Illinois bat species

Big Brown Bat – This bat is medium sized with an 11 to 13-inch wingspan. They are insectivorous and eat insects active at night such as moths, mosquitoes, and beetles. These bats are commonly found all over the United States and live over 10 years. Big brown bats can fly up to 40 mph!

 

Illinois bat species

Eastern Red Bat – This medium-sized bat is known for its red or chestnut colored fur. They are commonly found among branches of hardwood trees. The eastern red bat forages for food in open spaces.

Evening Bat

Evening Bat – This small species, weighing between 6 and 14 g. They are very commonly found roosting in tree cavities. These bats are also occasionally found in man-made structures. They feed heavily on beetles, as well as other nighttime insects.

illinois bat species

Gray Bat – These bats are cave-dependent and rely on caves, as opposed to other structures like trees or buildings. Disturbance in caves can be extremely detrimental to their population. They were once considered endangered in the late 70s. Through conservation efforts, the population has restored.

illinois bat species

Hoary Bat – This bat has unique coloring, which is dark at the roots and white at the tips. They are a larger species of bat with a wingspan of 15.5 inches. Hoary bats are rarely found in urban settings.

Illinois bat species

Indiana Bat – These bats tend to live in hardwood forests, but can be found in agricultural areas and fields. They are considered endangered and it is estimated that over 50% of their population has depleted over the past decade. They are sometimes confused for the little brown bat.

Little Brown Bat

Little Brown Bat – This bat is one of the most commonly found in America. They prefer to roost near water sources and are found in caves, buildings, trees, natural hollows, and woodpiles. Their survival is currently highly threatened due to white-nose syndrome.

illinois bat species

Northern Long-Eared Bat – These bats are known for their relatively long ears. They also have a longer tail than other Myotis bats. This species tends to live in boreal forests. In the fall, these bats migrate to hibernate.

Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat

Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat – This bat is sometimes known as the southeastern big-eared bat. They have inch long ears and a wingspan of 10-12 inches. Moths make up 90% of their diet. They can be found in the south and eastern sides of Illinois in abandoned buildings, under bridges, in wells, in caves, and trees.

Silver Haired Bat

Silver-Haired Bat – This medium-sized bat is mostly black in color, though their fur is white tipped. They roost in tree cavities and bark crevices. Their coloring makes them difficult to spot while roosting. This species prefers to eat moths but will eat spiders as well.

illinois bat species

Southeastern Bat – This bat has a wingspan of 9 to 11 inches. Their fur ranges in color from gray to orangish-brown. They like to hunt and feed over water. The Southeastern bat sometimes roosts with Rafinesque’s big-eared bats. They can be found in southern Illinois.

illinois bat species

Tri-Colored Bat – Formerly known as the eastern pipistrelle, the tri-colored bat is known for its interesting fur color. Their fur is brown at the tips, yellow in the middle, and black at the root. They are known as one of the smallest bats in North America, only weighing 4 to 10 g. They live about 10 to 15 years.

 

Bat Habitats

Most bats in Illinois roost in trees, caves, mines, rock crevices, and sometimes even under bridges when a cave isn’t available.

There are four species of bats in Illinois that have been known to take up residence in buildings or dwellings, including residential homes. Since there is not an abundance of insects during the fall and winter, most bats find a warmer climate or hibernate.

Most bats are either colonial or solitary. Colonial bats live together in colonies and solitary bats live as is suggested: alone.

Related: Bats in Attic During Winter

 

Bat Reproduction

Bats are mammals so their babies (called pups) are born alive (not hatched as some may think) and then nursed. Most females give birth to one or two pups per year, typically in May or June.

Bats do not build nests. When pups are born, they climb onto their mothers and hold on to them, except for when the mother has to hunt. Pups can usually fly on their own at about three weeks of age.

 

Bat Droppings

Bat droppings, called guano, can be easy to spot if you know what you are looking for. To the untrained eye, bat and mouse droppings may look similar, but they really aren’t.

Guano is shiny and brittle due to the consumption of insects. You will usually find piles of guano underneath bat roosts.

Related: Diseases in Bat Species

 

Little Brown Bat Population Decline

Recently, there has been a drastic decline in the population of the little brown bat. In fact, the decline is so severe, the little brown bat may soon find itself on the federal endangered species list.

The decline in population is due to an affliction known as White Noise Syndrome. White Noise Syndrome, a white fungus that grows in the nose of and on the muzzle, tail, and wings of a bat during hibernation, causes the bats to lose their fat reserves, which they desperately need during winter hibernation. Essentially, White Noise Syndrome causes bats to starve to death.

The cause of White Noise Syndrome is still unknown, and scientists and wildlife experts at both the state and federal level are continuing to monitor the situation.

When it comes to bat removal it is very important to contact the right animal removal to safely and humanely remove bats.

Attic Solutions - Contact Us TodayTo have professional remove bats or any unwanted animal from your home or business, call 847-464-1861 

Bat Hibernation Facts

Bat Hibernation Facts - Illinois Bats

When winter comes, it becomes that time of year again, the season for bat hibernation!

During the winter months in the Chicago area, it is possible for bats to take up residence in your home. And where there is one bat, there is often a colony of bats.

rabid bats

Due to the extreme temperatures during the winter months, there are far fewer flying insects, which means a lot less food for bats.

In order to survive, bats have to hibernate and need a comfortable environment that stays around 35-40 degrees Fahrenheit.

These intelligent creatures have learned attics are the perfect place to ride out the cold.

For professional bat removal call (847) 464-1861

 

When Do Bats Hibernate?

Bats in Illinois hibernate from late fall until early spring.

They will generally hibernate from sometime in November until sometime in April. Some years they may enter or leave hibernation earlier or later due to weather conditions.

Hibernating bats may come out of hibernation midwinter due to a sudden increase in temperatures that create a false signal that spring is near.

Some bats will come out of hibernation a couple times during the winter to rehydrate, and you may spot them outdoors because of this in December through February.

 

Where Do Bats Hibernate?

The places where bats go to hibernate are called hibernacula.

Hibernacula can vary depending on the species of bat. The most common hibernation sites for bats include caves, abandoned mines, hollow trees, buildings, attics, and bridges.

In Illinois, there are at least six species of bats that will hibernate through the winter. Other species will migrate south.

Some bats hibernate in groups and some hibernate individually. The preference for hibernating alone or in groups will varyies depending on the species.

 

How Did A Bat Get in My House?

Because bats are so small, it is not difficult for them to sneak in through a crevice, window, or chimney and move into your attic or basement.

Bats do not always end up at haunted houses! Any home with space, a place to roost, and nearby insects is at risk. If you have a bat in your home, you need a bat exclusion.

Bats are a protected species and this is not something you want to do yourself.

Related: How do animals get in your home?

 

What Is A Bat Exclusion?

Bat exclusion is the removal of bats from your home. Bats are a protected species under the Illinois wildlife code and any kind of poison or chemical use for removal is forbidden.

Exclusion is a multistep process and requires trained trustworthy professionals, like our technicians at Attic Solutions, who are familiar with the laws and regulations.

Related: Do I need a permit in Illinois to remove a wild animal?

 

What Kind Of Bats Are These?

While there are approximately 14 various species of bats in Illinois, the ones that most commonly move into your attic are Little Brown Bats and Big Brown Bats.

Since bats are not rodents, bat removal and exclusion may even be covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy.

Related: Bat species in Illinois

 

Are Bats Dangerous?

Bats are social, intelligent creatures. While they are extremely beneficial to insect control, they can be more than a nuisance when moving into your home.

Bats are not only carriers of rabies, a fatal disease, but a lesser-known danger is the health risk associated with bat excrement.

Exposure to bat droppings, or guano, may cause histoplasmosis. This disease primarily affects the lungs and if left untreated, can be fatal.

 


We are trained professionals and equipped to deal with bat exclusion and removal, including humane live animal trapping (never poisons!).

Attic Solutions - Call for Live Animal Removal, Dead Animal Removal, Attic RestorationFor professional bat removal services in Chicagoland call Attic Solutions (847) 464-1861

Attic Solutions can provide you with humane wild animal removal services in the Chicagoland suburbs. 

Satisfaction guaranteed!

Potential Health Problems Caused by Bats

The presence of bats always increases in the summer months and though they are interesting animals to see, they can cause some serious health problems in humans.  The actual rate at which this occurs is usually pretty low as bats tend to keep their distance but it is a good idea to stay away from bats if you see them outside just to avoid any possible health problems.  If you notice bats living in your attic or anywhere within your home, contact a wildlife professional like Attic Solutions immediately to have them removed.

The most dangerous and most common health concern brought on by bats is rabies.  While rabies can be quite severe, cases of humans attracting rabies from bats is very rare.  However, this does not mean that you should not take caution with bats.  Stay away from large bat populations and if you get bitten by a bat, wash the area with soap and water and immediately seek medical attention for rabies treatment.

In addition to rabies, bats can also transfer histoplasmosis which is an airborne disease that spreads from bat droppings.  Histoplasmosis has symptoms that are similar to the flu and in severe cases; the symptoms may resemble those of tuberculosis.  Most of the time, the symptoms of histoplasmosis are not visible in humans and it takes skin and blood tests to diagnose the infection.  If there are bats on your property or within your home, it is best to have a professional remove any droppings left behind to help reduce the risk of contracting histoplasmosis.

Bats are fascinating creatures and the health problems that they cause are not particularly widespread but if you notice bats in your home or property, it is still best to avoid them.  Bats can spread rabies through their bites and large amounts of their droppings can contribute to the spread of histoplasmosis.  If you have a bat infestation anywhere within your home, make sure to contact Attic Solutions immediately to remove the infestation and clean up their dropping to avoid any potential health problems.


As soon as you suspect you may have a bat infestation, call us immediately at 847-464-1861 for removal. We are trained professionals and equipped to deal with bat exclusion and removal, including humane live animal trapping (never poisons!). We will remove the bats and fix any property damage they may have caused. Click to read more about bat removal services from Attic Solutions