Tag Archives: bat removal

Bats in the attic

How to Get Bats Out of the House

 

Do you have a bat in the house?

Is it flying around in circles in your living room right now?

Remain calm!

Catching a bat is not necessarily easy, or recommended by us. But if you’re the DIY type, we won’t try to stop you.

For a FREE bat removal estimate call: (847) 464-1861

Will a bat attack people?

Bats are generally not aggressive but if it feels like you are threatening it, the bat could potentially bite you.

That bat doesn’t want to be in your house either. He’s trying to figure out how to get outside too.

The bat doesn’t want to fly into your hair and get stuck. The bat doesn’t want to bite you or suck your blood. That’s just what television makes you think.

However, a bat is still a wild animal, and wild animals can be unpredictable, they can bite, and bats can carry rabies or other diseases. Keep your pets away and proceed with caution!

Related: Bat myths and facts


Here is what you can do to get that bat out of your house.

If the bat can be isolated in a single room, that’s ideal. Start by closing interior doors to that room so the bat won’t escape to another part of your home where it may be even harder for him to escape or you to capture.

We don’t suggest you try catching a bat, but if you’re going to try, wear gloves, long pants and long sleeves, shoes and socks.

Open your windows and doors

Your first and easiest option is to open all the windows and doors in your home. Bats use echolocation to find their way around and they may be able to find their way out an open door or window without any help or coaxing.

Turning off interior and exterior lights may help. If there is something noisy such as a TV or an air conditioner in the room, it should be turned off as well.

Catch with a butterfly net

dangerous bats, are bats dangerousIf the bat takes a moment to land, you may be able to safely capture it with a butterfly net (if you have one).  Catching the bad mid-flight can be very challenging.

When caught, pull the top of the net closed or cover the opening with something like a piece of corrugated cardboard from a box. Be careful not to crush the bat or to touch it. Carry it carefully outside and release.

Related: Bats in the attic during winter months

Catch it with a container

You can use a bucket, Tupperware container or a large plastic bowl to try and capture the bat when it has landed. Carefully place the container over the bat on the wall and then use a piece of cardboard to slide under it before removing. Take it outside and release it.

Catch it with a blanket

You can use a blanket to try and capture a bat that has landed. Place it over the bat and gently bunch it up so it is closed inside. This method may not be best for the bat, because it could be easy for you to accidentally injure it.

For professional bat removal in Chicagoland call us at (847) 464-1861

 

Bats in the Attic During Winter Months

Brown bats in attic during winter

As the winter months approach, common bats will either migrate to warmer climates or more commonly, hibernate from November to April.

It’s quite possible bats may be hibernating in your attic!

It was once thought that bats usually hibernated in caves during the winter months but it is actually much more common for them to find a safe spot in homes and buildings. We just usually don’t realize it because bats don’t just find a spot at the top of your attic to hang as we might imagine.  They often will hibernate beneath your insulation or find a space in between the walls.

For bat removal in the Chicagoland region, call (847) 464-1861 

 

What not to do with bats in your attic

Evening BatDon’t seal their exit! The most common mistake people make is to seal all of the entries and exits during the day. The problem with this is that now you’ve trapped them inside. Those bats will now be desperate to get out and will very likely find their way into another room in your house, creating an unpleasant situation.

Don’t Kill the bats You may not realize this, but in Illinois, as in most states, bats are a protected species. They are so valuable in helping control insect populations that they are protected at both the state and federal level.

Related: Do I Need a Permit to Remove a Nuisance Animal in Illinois?

Don’t use poisons, glue boards, or high-frequency noise emitters Although you might be able to buy these products online, there is actually a federal ban on ultrasonic pest control devices. It is illegal to poison bats in Illinois.

 

What to do about bats in the attic

Inspection Whether you do it yourself or hire a professional bat removal service, the first step is a thorough inspection to find bats, their locations, entry and exit points.

Exclusion You need first to locate the primary entry and exit points while observing the bats in the evening. During the winter months, bats may exit your home to search for water if the temperature moves above 45 degrees. When all bats have left the home for evening hunting, this is when you should seal all entry points.

Professional Removal Bats in your attic during the winter months will spend a majority of the time being inactive. This is a good time to contact a professional removal service to have them safely removed. Remember, bats are a beneficial and protected species, so do not attempt to remove them yourself during hibernation.

Related: What is attic restoration?

 

Attic SolutionsCall a professional

If you don’t want to remove bats yourself (and we DON’T recommend it), then please call Attic Solutions at (847) 464-1861 for professional bat removal in the Chicagoland area.

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Image Source: Wikipedia Commons
Post Sources: The Bat Guy & MIBat Control

Bat Bugs: The Pest You’ve Never Heard Of

bat bugs

What is a Bat Bug?

Bat bugs are blood-sucking parasites that feed on the blood of bats. They will also bite humans. These parasites are closely related to bed bugs and often mistaken for them. In fact, microscopic identification is one of the only ways to distinguish between them. Bat bugs are flightless and travel by crawling.

Where Do They Live?

Bat bugs are moderately common in the Midwest, including Illinois. They are found in buildings and homes in which bats are present. They usually reside close to the bat’s roosting area, but will venture throughout the building if the bats leave or are removed. They do not live on bats, but may travel on a bat while they fly.

Feeding

Bat bugs feed on the blood of bats but feed on other warm-blooded animals. They will feed on humans if given the opportunity. They can survive a year without a blood meal, but will search for human hosts if bats are not present.

Are They A Threat To Humans?

Bat bug bites are nearly identical to bed bug bites. There are a variety of different reactions that come from a bat bug bite. Some experience inflamed, swollen spots, others have intense itching, and others show no signs of bites. Bat bugs are not known to transmit any diseases currently. Though they are not dangerous, they are pests that can breed fairly quickly and become an infestation.

What To Do

If you discover bats in your home, garage, or nearby property call animal control immediately. Removing bats from your property will immediately decrease the risk of bat bugs. Be especially vigilant for bat presence in old or abandoned buildings like barns and sheds. In addition, minimize risk of bats and bat bugs entering your home by sealing small entrances between the roof, siding, foundation, windows, and doors.

If you believe you have bat bugs, call a pest control service to identify and eliminate them.

Illinois Bat Species

There are 12 different species of bats that live in Illinois. Some hibernate in Illinois, while others migrate to warmer states. The most bat-heavy area of the state is in the southern area of Illinois, near the Mississippi and Illinois rivers. Read more to find out about Illinois bat species.

Illinois bat species

Big Brown Bat – This bat is medium sized with a 11 to 13 inch wingspan. They are insectivorous and eat insects active at night such as moths, mosquitoes, and beetles. These bats are commonly found all over the United States and live over 10 years. Big brown bats can fly up to 40 mph!

Illinois bat species

Eastern Red Bat – This medium sized bat is known for its red or chestnut colored fur. They are commonly found among branches of hardwood trees. The eastern red bat forages for food in open spaces.

illinois bat species

Evening Bat – This small species, weighing between 6 and 14 g. They are very commonly found roosting in tree cavities. These bats are also occasionally found in man-made structures. They feed heavily on beetles, as well as other nighttime insects.

illinois bat species

Gray Bat – These bats are cave dependent and rely on caves, as opposed to other structures like trees or buildings. Disturbance in caves can be extremely detrimental to their population. They were once considered endangered in the late 70s. Through conservation efforts the population has restored.

illinois bat species

Hoary Bat – This bat has unique coloring, which is dark at the roots and white at the tips. They are a larger species of bat with a wingspan of 15.5 inches. Hoary bats are rarely found in urban settings.

Illinois bat species

Indiana Bat – These bats tend to live in hardwood forests, but can be found in agricultural areas and fields. They are considered endangered and it is estimated that over 50% of their population has depleted over the past decade. They are sometimes confused for the little brown bat.

illinois bat species

Little Brown Bat – This bat is one of the most commonly found in America. They prefer to roost near water sources and are found in caves, buildings, trees, natural hollows, and woodpiles. Their survival is currently highly threatened due to white nose syndrome.

illinois bat species

Northern Long Eared Bat – These bats are known for their relatively long ears. They also have a longer tail than other myotis bats. This species tends to live in boreal forests. In the fall, these bats migrate to hibernate.

illinois bat species

Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat – This bat is sometimes known as the southeastern big-eared bat. They have inch long ears and a wingspan of 10-12 inches. Moths make up 90% of their diet. They can be found in the south and eastern sides of Illinois in abandoned buildings, under bridges, in wells, in caves, and trees.

illinois bat species

Silver-Haired Bat – This medium sized bat is mostly black in color, though their fur is white tipped. They roost in tree cavities and bark crevices. Their coloring makes them difficult to spot while roosting. This species prefers to eat moths but will eat spiders as well.

illinois bat species

Southeastern Bat – This bat has a wingspan of 9 to 11 inches. Their fur ranges in color from gray to orangeish-brown. They like to hunt and feed over water. The Southeastern bat sometimes roosts with Rafinesque’s big-eared bats. They can be found in southern Illinois.

illinois bat species

Tri-Colored Bat – Formerly known as the eastern pipistrelle, the tri-colored bat is known for its interesting fur color. Their fur is brown at the tips, yellow in the middle, and black at the root. They are known as one of the smallest bats in North America, only weighing 4 to 10 g. They live about 10 to 15 years.

These Illinois bat species are generally harmless and avoid human contact. However, if you discover a roost or bat in your home, contact animal control to have them safely removed.

Bat Myths

In this post, we review a list of myths about bats and their behavior. It turns out that many things people believe about bats are not true.

Bats

Bats Are Blind

You’ve heard the phrase “blind as a bat,” but it isn’t true at all.

Bats are not blind and all species can see. Because they hunt at night, they use their echolocation to help them locate prey, perhaps leading to the idea that they don’t use their vision at all.

However, bats use both echolocation and vision to hunt and navigate their way home.

 

Bats Attack People

swarm of bats flyingMost species of bats eat insects and fruit and have no interest in attacking humans for any reason.

Bats are not aggressive and do not behave aggressively toward humans; in fact, they usually try to avoid people.

 

Vampire Bats Suck Blood From People

There are three species of vampire bats that live in South and Central America, all of which do not eat human blood.

These bats prefer to take meals from sleeping animals, livestock or birds, and take about an ounce of blood at a time.

 

Bats Are Flying Mice or Related To Rats

Bats are not rodents or related to rats and mice. Bats are more closely related to primates and lemurs than rodents.

 

Bats Become Tangled In Hair

Bats occasionally may fly near your face but they avoid it with ease. Their echolocation is so incredibly efficient that it helps them avoid obstacles as small as a piece of string.

 

Bats Carry Rabies

Most bats do not have rabies, and they contract rabies much less than other animals.

Less than half of 1% of all bats may catch and contract the disease. However, if a bat bites you, immediately seek medical attention. The most common way to get rabies from a bat is handling a bat inside or near your home.

Always call animal control services to safely remove a bat from your home.

 

Get bats removed from your home and attic

If chipmunks are causing damage to your home or wreaking havoc on your yard, you can call a professional to have them safely removed.

Attic Solutions - Call for Live Animal Removal, Dead Animal Removal, Attic RestorationFor professional chipmunk removal services in Chicagoland, call Attic Solutions (847) 464-1861

Attic Solutions can provide you with humane wild animal removal services in the Chicagoland suburbs. 

Satisfaction guaranteed!

 

Sources:
6 Bat Myths Busted: Are They Really Blind? – National Geographic
7 Myths About Bats – Mental Floss
Myths and Facts – Bat World
Bats – Wikipedia

Attic Solutions Alert: Rabid Bats in Chicago Area

Bat, rabies, rabid batsAccording to a recent news report on ABC 7 Chicago, a local Naperville, Illinois family required rabies treatment after finding a rabid bat in their home. The family called Animal Control upon discovering the bat, which tested positive for rabies. Animal Control advised the entire family be inoculated against the disease since bats have such tiny teeth and could penetrate without leaving a mark.

Dr. Leroy Schild of Will County Animal Control advised that there were 13 cases of rabid bats in 2014 and 11 cases already this year. “This year is particularly bad because of the wet spring-… A lot of moisture, a lot of insects [sic] big food source for ’em,” he said.

Another family in Homer Glen found six rabid bats living in their garage and were also treated for rabies as a precaution. Animal Control authorities passed out flyers to neighbors in the area so they were aware of the situation.

It may seem unlikely that bats could get in your home, but you would be surprised how easy it is. Because bats are so small, it is not difficult for them to sneak in through a crevice, window, or chimney and move into your attic or basement.

As soon as you suspect you may have a bat infestation, call Attic Solutions immediately at 847-464-1861 for removal. We are trained professionals and equipped to deal with bat exclusion and removal. We will remove the bats and fix any property damage they may have caused.

Attic Solutions Alert: Dangers Of Wild Animal Bites

Vicious Raccoon, Rabies, Wild Animal, pest control, animal removelA bite or scratch from any wild animal, or even that of a domestic house pet like a dog or cat, can be dangerous. Even if the wound is minor, it can become infected and spread throughout your body. Further, any bite can carry disease. One of the most common causes for worry among wild animal bites is rabies.

What Is Rabies?

Rabies is a viral infection of warm-blooded animals. It is most commonly found in bats, raccoons, skunks, coyotes, and foxes in North America, although wild animals can infect dogs, cats, and livestock. The disease attacks the nervous system and, once symptoms develop, it is 100 percent fatal in animals.

How Do You Get Rabies?

You can contract rabies through a cut or scratch on your body, or through the mucous membranes (the lining of your eyes or mouth). The virus travels to your central nervous system in your brain and then travels to various organs where it multiplies.

Rabies Symptoms

  • Stage 1 (symptoms lasting 2 to 10 days)
    • Fever
    • Headache
    • Vomiting
    • Decreased Appetite
    • Malaise
    • Pain, itching or numbness around the wound site
  • Stage 2
    • Difficulty swallowing
    • Disorientation
    • Agitation
    • Becoming paralyzed

How To Diagnose Rabies

Animals are diagnosed fairly quickly. A test called direct fluorescent antibody test (DFA) is most often used by laboratories and results can be had in as little as a few hours. In humans, it is a bit more complex. Several tests must be completed for confirmation including saliva, serum, spinal fluid, and skin biopsies from the back of the neck.

What Is The Treatment For Rabies

There is not a cure for rabies and it is more difficult to treat once symptoms have presented. However, there are vaccines that provide rabies immunity following exposure or to prevent it (which is useful for people who work with animals like vets).

What To Do If Bitten By Wild Animal

  • Wash the wound with soap and water.
  • If bleeding, apply pressure.
  • Dry and cover the wound, but do not use tape or bandages to prevent trapping bacteria.
  • Call your doctor or healthcare professional for further instructions.
  • Locate the animal that bit you if possible.

How To Prevent Being Bitten

  • Avoid strange or sick animals.
  • Do not bother animals who are eating.
  • Keep pets on a leash.
  • Do not separate fighting animals.
  • Always get your family pets their rabies shots.
  • Supervise your pets outside.
  • Do not play with or approach wild animals.

As soon as you suspect you may have a wild animal infestation, call Attic Solutions immediately at 847-464-1861 for removal. We are trained professionals and equipped to deal with the issue. We will remove the animals and fix any property damage they may have caused.

 

White Nose Syndrome Cure For Bats?

white nose syndromeOver the last decade, white-nose syndrome has killed more than 5.7 million bats across the United States and Canada. The disease was originally discovered in New York in 2006 and has spread at a rapid pace across the country since then. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources recently issued a statement cautioning Illinois residents that entire bat populations were dying throughout the Eastern United States while they hibernated in their caves and mines.

White-nose syndrome is named for a white fungus or mold (Pseudogymnoascus destructans [SU-doh-JIM-no-ASK-us DIH-STRUK-tans], also known as Pd) that grows on the nose and wings of infected bats. The fungus eats holes in the wings of bats, which causes them to become too weak to hunt. The bats eventually lose their fat reserves, which they need to survive during the winter and then starve to death. Interestingly, this same fungus does not kill bats in Europe because it seems to have evolved.

So far, while researchers and scientists have explored many white-noise treatments, none of the tested bats have been returned to the wild. That is, until May 19, 2015. On that night, a group of scientists released 150 bats that had been treated for white-nose syndrome back into the wild near Hannibal, Missouri. As recently as last fall, those same bats were suffering from the fungus. While the results are encouraging, since this was the first group of bats returned to the wild after being treated for white-nose syndrome  we still have yet to see what happens. Craig Willis, a biologist at the University of Winnipeg in Canada who studies bats, but was not involved in this project says “there’s still a lot we need to know [about bats and the treatment] before we can get close to calling this or anything else a ‘cure.’”

Bat Species in Illinois

Bat Species in Illinois - Small Brown Bat

In this post, we review the most common species of bats found in Illinois.

If you need bat removal services from your Chicagoland home, please call us at (847) 464-1861

Bats are found throughout the United States and all of North America. They are actually the second largest order of mammals and comprise about 20% of all mammal species in the world. There are over 1,200 species of bats worldwide.

The most bat-heavy area of the state is in the southern area of Illinois, near the Mississippi and Illinois rivers.

Some bats hibernate in Illinois, while others migrate to warmer states.

 

How many types of bats are found in Illinois?

There are 12 different species of bats that are commonly found in Illinois.

Don’t be alarmed; all of the bats who call Illinois home are insectivorous, which means they only hunt insects.

The bat species that are most commonly found nesting in homes, attics and structures are the Little Brown Bat ( Myotis Lucifugus ) and Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus Fuscus ).

Related: How to Get Bats Out of the House

 

Types of Illinois Bats

  • Little Brown Bat
  • Big Brown Bat
  • Southeastern Bat
  • Indiana Bat
  • Eastern Pipistrelle
  • Northern Long-Eared Myotis
  • Gray Bat
  • Silver-Haired Bat
  • Eastern Red Bat
  • Hoary Bat
  • Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat
  • Evening Bat

 

Illinois bat species

Big Brown Bat – This bat is medium sized with an 11 to 13-inch wingspan. They are insectivorous and eat insects active at night such as moths, mosquitoes, and beetles. These bats are commonly found all over the United States and live over 10 years. Big brown bats can fly up to 40 mph!

 

Illinois bat species

Eastern Red Bat – This medium-sized bat is known for its red or chestnut colored fur. They are commonly found among branches of hardwood trees. The eastern red bat forages for food in open spaces.

Evening Bat

Evening Bat – This small species, weighing between 6 and 14 g. They are very commonly found roosting in tree cavities. These bats are also occasionally found in man-made structures. They feed heavily on beetles, as well as other nighttime insects.

illinois bat species

Gray Bat – These bats are cave-dependent and rely on caves, as opposed to other structures like trees or buildings. Disturbance in caves can be extremely detrimental to their population. They were once considered endangered in the late 70s. Through conservation efforts, the population has restored.

illinois bat species

Hoary Bat – This bat has unique coloring, which is dark at the roots and white at the tips. They are a larger species of bat with a wingspan of 15.5 inches. Hoary bats are rarely found in urban settings.

Illinois bat species

Indiana Bat – These bats tend to live in hardwood forests, but can be found in agricultural areas and fields. They are considered endangered and it is estimated that over 50% of their population has depleted over the past decade. They are sometimes confused for the little brown bat.

Little Brown Bat

Little Brown Bat – This bat is one of the most commonly found in America. They prefer to roost near water sources and are found in caves, buildings, trees, natural hollows, and woodpiles. Their survival is currently highly threatened due to white-nose syndrome.

illinois bat species

Northern Long-Eared Bat – These bats are known for their relatively long ears. They also have a longer tail than other Myotis bats. This species tends to live in boreal forests. In the fall, these bats migrate to hibernate.

Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat

Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat – This bat is sometimes known as the southeastern big-eared bat. They have inch long ears and a wingspan of 10-12 inches. Moths make up 90% of their diet. They can be found in the south and eastern sides of Illinois in abandoned buildings, under bridges, in wells, in caves, and trees.

Silver Haired Bat

Silver-Haired Bat – This medium-sized bat is mostly black in color, though their fur is white tipped. They roost in tree cavities and bark crevices. Their coloring makes them difficult to spot while roosting. This species prefers to eat moths but will eat spiders as well.

illinois bat species

Southeastern Bat – This bat has a wingspan of 9 to 11 inches. Their fur ranges in color from gray to orangish-brown. They like to hunt and feed over water. The Southeastern bat sometimes roosts with Rafinesque’s big-eared bats. They can be found in southern Illinois.

illinois bat species

Tri-Colored Bat – Formerly known as the eastern pipistrelle, the tri-colored bat is known for its interesting fur color. Their fur is brown at the tips, yellow in the middle, and black at the root. They are known as one of the smallest bats in North America, only weighing 4 to 10 g. They live about 10 to 15 years.

 

Bat Habitats

Most bats in Illinois roost in trees, caves, mines, rock crevices, and sometimes even under bridges when a cave isn’t available.

There are four species of bats in Illinois that have been known to take up residence in buildings or dwellings, including residential homes. Since there is not an abundance of insects during the fall and winter, most bats find a warmer climate or hibernate.

Most bats are either colonial or solitary. Colonial bats live together in colonies and solitary bats live as is suggested: alone.

Related: Bats in Attic During Winter

 

Bat Reproduction

Bats are mammals so their babies (called pups) are born alive (not hatched as some may think) and then nursed. Most females give birth to one or two pups per year, typically in May or June.

Bats do not build nests. When pups are born, they climb onto their mothers and hold on to them, except for when the mother has to hunt. Pups can usually fly on their own at about three weeks of age.

 

Bat Droppings

Bat droppings, called guano, can be easy to spot if you know what you are looking for. To the untrained eye, bat and mouse droppings may look similar, but they really aren’t.

Guano is shiny and brittle due to the consumption of insects. You will usually find piles of guano underneath bat roosts.

Related: Diseases in Bat Species

 

Little Brown Bat Population Decline

Recently, there has been a drastic decline in the population of the little brown bat. In fact, the decline is so severe, the little brown bat may soon find itself on the federal endangered species list.

The decline in population is due to an affliction known as White Noise Syndrome. White Noise Syndrome, a white fungus that grows in the nose of and on the muzzle, tail, and wings of a bat during hibernation, causes the bats to lose their fat reserves, which they desperately need during winter hibernation. Essentially, White Noise Syndrome causes bats to starve to death.

The cause of White Noise Syndrome is still unknown, and scientists and wildlife experts at both the state and federal level are continuing to monitor the situation.

When it comes to bat removal it is very important to contact the right animal removal to safely and humanely remove bats.

Attic Solutions - Contact Us TodayTo have professional remove bats or any unwanted animal from your home or business, call 847-464-1861 

What To Look For In An Animal Removal Company

Opossum RemovalDiscovering you have an uninvited animal living in your home can be both frightening and stressful. Wild animals can cause damages that are costly to fix and may even pose a health hazard. Not only can removing wild animals from your home be dangerous, there may also be laws and ordinances you aren’t even aware of governing the procedure. If you find yourself needing to hire a professional animal removal company, there are several factors you should take in to consideration.

Methodology

How does the animal removal company actually remove the animals? Attic Solutions believes in the providing the most humane animal removal service possible. Attic Solutions is also well versed in state wildlife law as well as local ordinances pertaining to animals and animal removal.

Services

Rat RemovalSome animal removal companies offer full services, like Attic Solutions, while others only do the basics. Attic Solutions is committed to not only catching the wild critter, but also repairing any damage they may have caused and repairing their point of entry. Attic Solutions believes it is important to offer a full range of services and make sure your home is fully restored.

Sometimes, you may not have a live animal causing the problems. If you are dealing with a carcass, many times local Animal Control agencies will not perform removal. A private animal removal company like Attic Solutions can do the dirty work for you.

What Animals?

You will want to look at what types of animals a company. Is it primarily pest control? Rodents only? Or, is it a full-service company that can assist with you a variety of creatures? Attic Solutions has trained animal-removal professionals who are qualified to assist with a wide range of animals.

Cost

Pricing is an important factor as well when choosing an animal removal company. Find out if the company charges by the hour, by the job, or even by the number of animals. Many times you might think you only have one little critter living rent-free in your home when really that one little critter has his entire extended family moved in!

Always err on the side of caution and do not try to wild animals on your own. Without realizing it, you could endanger yourself or the animal, or even be in violation of a law or ordinance. Call a trained professional like Attic Solutions who are familiar with humane and effective animal removal procedures.